Exhibitions

Would you like to live in a country where roads are excellent, business and industry prosper, new buildings are rising, formal and natural sciences are responsibly taught, but…  there is no culture?

It is easy to imagine how empty, dismal, faceless and submissively prepared for the coming and rooting of any alien culture it would be.  Strangers will gradually thrust their history, language, values and beauty criteria, and then their goals of life upon such a country. Lithuania experienced it before… The states, alien to Lithuania, repeatedly attempted to impose their views and aspirations, and it was only thanks to vibrant culture that our country did not plunge into historic obscurity.   

The essence of culture is most expressly and intensely revealed by art, by all of its forms – painting, sculpture, literature, film, music, theatre, etc. Works of art give plenty of aesthetic, emotional, intellectual experiences, therefore are instrumental in the life of the state and are inseparable parts of our lives. 

Art helps us stand out as interesting, unique and exceptional in the broad global context. As for us as individuals, art helps us comprehend ourselves and solve existential dilemmas. Works of art are an indispensable condition for humane politics and successful business because everything – be it architecture, books, museum exhibitions, or brass bands playing in parks – becomes a unique sign of our country’s civilisation. 

Artwork has become an integral part of the permanent exposition. It is displayed in four locations. The exhibition Freedom to Create features the winners of the Lithuanian National Culture and Art Prize. The exhibition Identity speaks of who we are, and the Scars of Memory represents historic memory that unites us. In the Archive you can find the exhibitions that are already closed: A walk in Siberia and Pro-Test lab.

                                                                                                    
                                                                 Freedom to Create

               Scars of Memory                                                          Identity